Scalp health and hair loss link

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Scalp health and hair loss link

Postby KC » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:34 am

Have any of you considered scalp health as a link to hair loss. I have. The scalp is an extension of the skin on your face. Imagin what your face would look like if it wasn't cleansed to remove oil, dirt and excess skin cells. The scalp isn't any different. With hair on the scalp, it is difficult at best to cleanse and detoxify the epidermis. Some conditions cause a hyper production of skin cells, sebum oil, bacteria and fungus. A little known mite called the Demodex folliculorm and its counter part demodex brevis live with in the follicle. These mites can wreak havoc with the production of hair follicles. IMO hair loss is a combination of 5 things.

Scalp plaque build-up is a combination of excess skin cells, crystalized sebum and fungus. When the build up becomes extreme, the hair can no longer penetrate the plaque.

Sebum oil, is a waxy/oil substance that has highly active amounts of DHT. Perspiration is full of oil, DHT and salt. None of which is healthy for the skin on the scalp or the follicles.

Sebum plugs are cork like when dried by air, combined with dirt and excess oil which clog the follicle opening. Once the plug is hardened, the hair becomes weak and fine (vellous hair) and can no longer pierce the plug.

The immune system typically keeps these things in check, but when comprimised or suppressed, fail to work properly.

Demodex mites, known as the common eye lash and eye brow mite, are transferred by face contact and starts in infancy. Once we reach adolesence, the face and scalp are well on their way to being colonized. The nocturnal mite exits and returns to the follicle to breed. On the scalp it craws through bacteria and fungus and brings it back into the follicle causing possible infection. Hence scalp pimples, scalp itch and hair loss.

Regular scalp cleansings remove these factors, help to control these conditions and restore scalp health an hygiene. When the scalp is healthy, dormant yet viable follicles regenerate hair.

When these 5 factors combine, hair loss occurs.
KC
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Postby Booly » Thu Jul 06, 2006 2:26 pm

Go on regrowth.com, there is a lot of threads about that
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Postby James » Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:07 pm

Booly, she is the one who has been posting at Regrowth and now is posting here as well.
James
 

Yes I belong to both forums.

Postby KC » Fri Jul 07, 2006 4:13 am

I was invited by a member who is also a member of regrowh, to come visit and join this forum. Yes I developed a treatment that can treat and prevent hair loss in the majority of people. I have promised not state my business name or promote business here at this site. Anyone interested in talking to me direct must contact me via the site.

My primary purpose is to share information concerning hair loss alternatives. I find most people would rather not have follicular surgery or take an oral supplements to support hair growth. If I am out of line let me know. I have no interest in offending anyone.
KC
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Postby James » Fri Jul 07, 2006 1:29 pm

KC- What type of shampoo do you recommend?

How do you feel about Nizoral? Some people use Nizoral for hair loss.

I have read posts from people who think that NOT SHAMPOOING has really helped their hair loss. What do you think could be going on there?
James
 

Postby Booly » Sat Jul 08, 2006 4:12 am

Oh, welcome here so :)

I was thinking to buy nizoral too, I heard so many good feedbacks
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Postby Armando » Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:54 am

Hi;

KC wrote:
Demodex mites, known as the common eye lash and eye brow mite, are transferred by face contact and starts in infancy. Once we reach adolesence, the face and scalp are well on their way to being colonized. The nocturnal mite exits and returns to the follicle to breed. On the scalp it craws through bacteria and fungus and brings it back into the follicle causing possible infection. Hence scalp pimples, scalp itch and hair loss.

Please, how do you explain the special pattern of hair loss? maybe due that side of scalp are in contact (preassure) with the pillow and don't allow a good travel to mites in the night?

And also, how do you explain the different incidence of hair loss between sexes?
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Postby Jacob » Tue Jul 11, 2006 6:59 pm

Equisomin does wonders for scalp health :wink:
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Armando

Postby KC » Thu Jul 13, 2006 6:54 am

The explination is more complicated than you might think.

The reason most do not experience hair loss in the occipital area and around the ears is there are far less hormone receptors and smaller sebum glands. That is why the HT people transplant hair from that region. 98% of the population have the demodex. They are also practically impossible to irradicate. They are a contact mite. Every time your face, head or part of you body comes into contact with them they are transmited. Like head lice, they do not fly or jump. They crawl. Pillow pressure has nothing to do with how the mite travels. They can also live on your pillows and bed sheets for 52 hours before they die. If you cannot remove the yellowish stain from the pillow or bed linen, toss them and buy new. I find bleach and hot water removes the stain.

One in four women experience hair loss. They just hide it better than men. As hard as it is for men to loose their hair, it is devastating for women. With the exception of most of the men suffering from hair loss, society has accepted mens hair loss. The latest fashion statement? Shave your head. Not many women would consider this an alternative.

Hair loss differences in the sexes is some what different. As a woman enters menopause, as early as their mid 30's in my case, their chemical physiology changes. They start producing more of the male hormone DHT, hence the facial hair on my chinny chin chin.(eeewww). They also experience hormone fluxuations, power surges (hot flashes) lol, which produce more perspiration. Perspiration consists of moisture, salt and DHT rich oil which when left upon the scalp, produces a micro-thin, co-polymer layer adding to the buildup. With the aid of a cosmetic scope, she is able to see the layers of build up around the follicle. They stack upon each other looking similar to steps on a stairway. Women also loose their hair differently. Similar to wearing a hat, they loose the majority of hair from the ears up. It becomes so thin they wear their hair differently to cover the loss, use a topical cover like Topix or start wearing wigs.

Some women have very dry scalps. In their case, I find it's more of a DHT and build up problem. Once the build up is removed, the scalp has been stimulated and brings oxygen rich blood to the surface. New hairs start growing in follicles already occupied by hair, while the sebum plugs are being removed from clogged follicles. Everytime the toxic material within the follicle is removed, healing begins.

Women who are oily, tend to have the same issues men do with the demodex. Although I must say, the oily scalps tend to have a more lubricated follicle, allowing for the sebum mass to be extracted easier. The down side is, with more oil, there is more food for the demodex.
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Postby Armando » Fri Jul 14, 2006 1:52 am

Thank you for your explanation KC;
"The reason most do not experience hair loss in the occipital area and around the ears is there are far less hormone receptors and smaller sebum glands"

It is possible these diferences in a healthy scalp hair?, I doubt it.

My theory talks about problems in sebum flow, not only with mites. Inflamation, fibrosis, hormonal, etc are also implicated but the first problem could be inside the pilosebaceous system when the hardened sebum deposit in the same road that travel the stem cells from the bulge area to the dermal papilla.

Please visit my web: http://www.againstalopeciaandbaldness.com

Armando
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